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Much to my mother’s dismay, I’ve been an entrepreneur since I was a kid. I put her through the wringer with all my shenanigans but she was always my biggest cheerleader.

From the Beginning

It all started around age 7 (back when AOL was all the rage) and I had Logan’s Movies & More: an AOL Hometown site where I rented movies (and more) to the neighbors. Around age 13, I really wanted to start a broadcast TV station so I called all the local businesses from my grandmother’s house and solicit ads to get funds to do that — it didn’t work well for me.

Something that still stands out to me about my elementary school years is how several of my peers also saw the entrepreneur in me at such an early age.

Around 3rd or 4th grade, one kid even offered me his resume for “Logan Bibby Inc” and said he wanted to work for me.

In 7th or 8th grade, our gifted class had “personal projects” each grading period where each student would have free reign to do a project and present it to the class. One grading period, I decided I’d start a radio station (I guess if the TV station didn’t work, why not try the next best medium?) and I called it Blue Fusion Radio after the then-popular Dr Pepper Red Fusion soda.

Being the stickler for the rules, I filed for the FCC license without telling my mother. The rest is hearsay from my now late mother, but she was contacted by the FCC threatening legal action because of my age and she came to my defense despite having no idea what the hell they were talking about. I ended up not getting a license and being part of the inspiration of the rule requiring licensees to be of a certain age.

Throughout high school, I started various companies including Cerberus Computer Company to build PCs, selling on eBay, and a website called Quotated that allowed anonymous quotes to be posted.

I started learning web design and development (HTML, CSS, PHP, and Perl) in middle school after I called a web design company for one of my ventures and learned they wanted to charge $10,000 for a website. I decided to put that knowledge to good use and sell my skills: Solitary Geek was born and was a web design company — named for myself being a programming geek without many (if any) programming friends. We had a couple of customers and I learned so much about marketing with that. It was a solid foundation for my post-childhood company Bibwell.

After High School and Beyond

When I graduated high school, I incorporated my first company: Bibwell Enterprises, Inc. I didn’t have a big plan for Bibwell, I just knew I wanted a corporation under my belt. During college, I started developing a product called MinistryInSites which would provide a website builder for churches (I never finished it) and I continued to do web design under that company, but it mostly sat dormant until 2013.

Around 2009, Keobi Communication Corporation was another college-era company I started to provide low-cost PBX telephony services to business, but I also never finished it either and later dissolved it.

After I dropped out of college, I worked IT for a large local hospital and started getting bored after my mother passed away. It was a dead-end job (because it would take a decade to advance since I didn’t have a degree) working night weekends.

In 2012, I bought a house, and, by happenstance, I became the IT consultant for the real estate company my agent worked for in January 2013. IT consulting became the primary purpose of Bibwell and I continued to grow my IT customer base until I left my hospital job to work for myself fulltime. It went through a managery of names: Help From Logan, Logan Helps, IT By Logan (to name a few). However, with the help of my artist friend, I later rebranded it to Zentek. At the peak, my IT company had an office in a historic house downtown, several customers, and even a few employees.

Despite the success, I saw that local IT wouldn’t bring the wealth and success In 2016, I started a new company (adopting Zentek’s branding) that focused on selling essential technologies to businesses — internet, TV, telephone, antivirus, software, and backup. It was doomed from the start. 2016 and 2017 saw the beginning of the eventual collapse of Bibwell and my transition into a 9-to-5 life later in 2018.

Between 2016 and 2018, I started but never quite completed a few different projects including WatchdogID and Dudley Farms. You can read about those and my current projects over on the Projects page.

For more on my current entrepreneurial endeavors, head over to my Entrepreneurship page.

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